THE "JOBS COMMITTEE"

The main goal of Jobs-First.org is to advocate for a new Joint House and Senate Committee on Job Creation, Economic Growth, and Global Competitiveness.  Currently, there is a House Subcommittee on Economic Growth, Job Creation, and Regulatory Affairs chaired by Rep. Jim Jordan (Republican, OH-4). 

This Committee supposedly focuses on “policies that will get Americans back to work,” but demonstrates little interest in job creation or economic growth, and instead focuses on the IRS, Affordable Care Act, and investigating government regulators.

THE JOINT COMMITTEE CONCEPT

The new committee should be bicameral and utilize fact-based performance measures to analyze policy proposals.  It could also act as a clearing house for all federal activities impacting jobs and the economy, similarly to how the National Counterterrorism Center organizes all US counterterrorism efforts. 

It would further these efforts by developing partnerships, soliciting proposals, and funding internships/fellowships for state/local governments, non-profits, universities, and private firms.

Each committee meeting would focus on one particular topic area and call upon a panel of subject matter experts to provide their best ideas.  Once the experts reach a consensus, their recommendations are provided to the committee for debate and a vote.  Once the final vote is completed, the legislation would be sent to the floor for an up or down vote (i.e. with no amendments or filibusters).

THE CAUCUS OPTION

Given the partisan nature of the current Congress, it is unlikely that the current power structure would allow for any new committees.  But, lawmakers could circumvent the committee process by forming a Joint “Caucus” on Jobs, Economic Growth, and Global Competitiveness.  There are over 694 caucuses ranging from the Congressional Gaming Caucus to the Congressional Cement Caucus, but this group could be billed as a special interest group for “working Americans.”

CAUCUS WORKING GROUPS

The genesis of the Contract with America began in 1994 when the House Republicans formed ten working groups which drafted the ten pieces of legislation which made up the contract.  Similarly, members of the Jobs Caucus could form Task Forces address specific issues. These Groups would have deadlines to complete legislation, obtain cost estimates from the Congressional Budget Office, and submit their bills to the leader of the caucus.

The caucus leader would be responsible for consolidating all of the bills into on package and providing each piece of legislation to the appropriate committee for a vote.  Whether or not the bill is voted out of the committee, each of the caucus members should vote for the proposed legislation and use that vote, along with their work on the jobs caucus, as part of their campaign platform.

The caucus leader would be responsible for consolidating all of the bills into on package and providing each piece of legislation to the appropriate committee for a vote.  Whether or not the bill is voted out of the committee, each of the caucus members should vote for the proposed legislation and use that vote, along with their work on the jobs caucus, as part of their campaign platform.